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Hatching Eggs and a Broody Duck

hatching eggs
How do you survive hatching eggs and a broody duck? I had no idea what I was getting into the first time one of our ducks decided to brood a clutch of eggs. Here’s a recap of the events as they unfolded a few years ago. Since then, every year, at least one of our ducks has decided to set a clutch of eggs. We have had a few successful hatches and quite a few heartbreaks from predators stealing eggs. It is quite an experience.

Hatching Eggs and a Broody Duck

For the past month our buff duck hen has been broody. I went away at the beginning of August and when I returned she had made herself very comfortable on a nest of 10 duck eggs. And oh my, was she broody. She would sit there and quack at the top of her lungs, her duck bill wide open. I referred to it as shouting and asked her to please use her indoor voice.

Like clockwork, every day, twice a day, momma would leave the nest to relieve herself, grab a bite to eat, stretch her wings and take a short swim and grooming session. Then she would shout, all the way back to the nest, letting all the other ducks know how special her task was. This is not unusual behavior for a broody duck with hatching eggs. While she was off the nest, our Buff Drake would stand by the nest guarding it, while broody momma took her break. He wasn’t as protective as she was, nor as threatening, but he did guard the eggs from the other ducks. One of our Rouen Hens would join him, from time to time. I was never sure if she wanted to sit on the hatching eggs or if she just wanted to be part of the miracle of life.

Checking for Development 

I candled the eggs and sure enough, most of them were developing. The ones that didn’t seem to be developing, I left there because I had an idea of what would happen next.

Hatching Eggs and a Broody Duck

Time went on, and momma did her job admirably. Until last week. Momma started to kick eggs out of the nest. This was what I expected, and upon opening the rejected eggs, there was no developing duckling. Just rotten eggs.

As this week began, I was hopeful that the three remaining eggs would hatch. The expected blessed event was to happen over Labor Day weekend so I was getting excited.

And then…..

Then, the worst happened. Momma kicked one of the good eggs out of the nest yesterday. I noticed the nest was not being sat on. I can’t really explain how I knew but it just looked different. Then, I felt the two remaining eggs. Cold as ice. Not even remotely warm. But I was in denial, and left them in the nest. I waited for momma to return to setting but it got dark and I had to go home.

Today, Momma was out hanging out with the other ducks and not quacking up a storm any longer. In fact, she was acting like all the other ducks again! I hoped that meant that the ducklings had hatched and she had them somewhere inside. But when I entered the coop, there were just two very cold, abandoned eggs sitting in the nest. No one was guarding the eggs. They were definitely abandoned. I removed them from the nest.

I had to know. Breaking open the eggs revealed two almost fully ready dead ducklings. Nature took over and for some reason, theses little ducks were not fit to hatch out. Maybe they had health problems, maybe momma was a bad momma. We will never know the answer.

Moving Forward 

I have had success in the past, hatching out our duck eggs using the incubator. We still have four that we hatched here, and they are healthy and active 15 month old ducks. So I know our duck’s eggs are fertile and capable of producing life.

Am I disappointed? Yes, absolutely. This was a tough year as far as bringing babies up here at Timber Creek Farm. Now the disappointment of no newly hatched ducklings.

The good news is, tomorrow is another day. The ducks will start to lay eggs again. The good news on the farm is that there is always beauty to be found. Some days you have to look a little harder for your encouragement.

(This story, with a much happier ending, was the basis for my latest book. Margarita and the Beautiful Gifts is available on Amazon and through the shop tab on this website.)

hatching eggs



Adding Animals to the Homestead

adding animals to the homesteadSomewhere along your homesteading journey, you will probably get the itch to start adding animals to the homestead. Or, the opportunity will present itself in an offer you can’t refuse. Perhaps someone is giving away a flock of “free” chickens, or you fall in love with a baby goat and decide this is the right time for adding animals to the homestead.

What Is the Right Time for Adding Animals to the Homestead?

Adding Animals to the homestead

Whether it’s a well planned adventure, or a series of events, you should have an idea beforehand of what each type of care the animal will require. We have raised and kept many kinds of pets and livestock at Timber Creek Farm. Our first animals were horses and ponies, followed by goats, a donkey, chickens, rabbits, ducks, sheep, turkeys, cows and pigs. There is much to be said for practical, hands on learning. I will be honest, and tell you that I have not always followed the advice I am giving out now. As they say, hindsight is 20/20!

Read and Ask Questions Before Adding Animals to the Homestead

Ask lots of questions and be prepared for on the job learning! But, that said, try to be as prepared as possible, BEFORE adding animals to the homestead!

1. Build suitable fencing and secure housing. 

This can be a hard point if you are not sure what the animal needs. Different animals and poultry require different housing and fencing. Chickens will be safely housed in a secure coop with appropriate ventilation and interior accessories such as nest boxes and roosts. Pigs don’t require an enclosed building necessarily. An open shed will serve as adequate shelter but the fencing for pigs most likely will need a line or two of electric to persuade the pigs to stay put. Know what each species needs in order to be raised successfully.

2. Be aware of predators in your area and learn how to keep your animals safe.

If all of this is new to you, ask other neighbors or the Extension Service agent in your area for information about possible predators, in your area. Use the appropriate fencing to keep predators out of the animal’s area. Using the wrong wire fencing can lead to tragedy. You can read more about the different fencing for chickens in this post.

3. Make sure you have a way to get plenty of water to the animals, even in subfreezing temperatures. 

There aren’t many things that happen around the farm that I don’t enjoy. Except for carrying water to the animals when the hoses are frozen and the water tanks are solid blocks of ice. We need about 15 gallons of water in the morning and evening to keep everyone hydrated. That’s just the animals who don’t have floating tank deicers in their water. Water is a big concern during extreme weather. In the event of possible power outage from a big storm, we stock up by filling all the tanks before the storm hits. Yes, think about water. These electric heated water bowls can help with water staying thawed during the day. I recommend uplugging them at night and refilling in the morning. Chickens don’t need water available while they are sleeping.

4. Having all things in place before the animals arrival, will  add to your enjoyment of raising livestock.

I preach this. It’s my mantra. Unfortunately, I don’t often take my own advice. Yes, I too succumb to bringing home animals without making the proper plan ahead of time. Fortunately, we have lots of available options for temporary housing when my heart gets ahead of my better judgement. But it all goes smoother if you plan ahead. Believe me, you will still have plenty of reasons to make adjustments once you get to know the new arrivals.

  DSC_2091 Adding animals to your homestead timber creek farm

DSC_3278 Timber Creek Farm Add Animals to you farm

What is the best animal to start with?

I can’t tell you which animal type is the best one to purchase first, when adding animals to the homestead. This depends on your ability to care for them and your particular passions. If you love fiber crafts and yarn then you may want to raise your own sheep or fiber animals. If the thought of caring for a large sheep scares you, perhaps an angora rabbit would be a good choice. Large families or those with specific dietary needs, may consider raising meat animals might help the food budget.

Urban homesteaders may have limitations set by the town government, on what can be kept within the city limits. I put the information that you can use  to make a decision into a table format. The dollar estimates are based on an average cost in the mid Atlantic region at the time of writing. Your local feed store or veterinarian prices may vary but this will give you a starting place for your planning. 

How Much Time is Involved in Animal Care?

All livestock require everyday care. We feed all of our animals twice a day. I am sure there are folks who feed once a day but feeding twice a day gives you twice the opportunity to head off a potential problem. Sometimes, twenty four hours can make a difference in the health of your animal, and catching an illness early can often save the animals life. Each week, more intensive labor chores are completed, such as moving hay bales to the barn, cleaning stalls and pens, and filling up water troughs. Basically, the larger the animal, the larger the cleanup effort!

Refer to the following sections for my estimates on the physical strength, costs and care required for various species.

Care Needs of Different Homestead Livestock

 Physical Strength NeededAverage CostsTime requirementConcerns or notes
Chickens and Ducks
(laying hens for eggs)
Other than being able to clean the coop regularly, carry water to the coop and hold a chicken if it should need medical attention, strength needed is average. Raising poultry is suitable for those learning to homestead.In a coop and enclosed pen situation, estimate 50 lb bag of layer ration for 12 - 15 mature hens. Costs will vary but an estimate of $12- $16 dollars a week is an average. If you are able to free range, the feed cost will go down. Minimum of twice a day care needed to freshen the water, remove old feed and distribute fresh feed. Cleaning weekly as needed. Less cleaning is needed in the winter months as the accumulated bedding will help warm and insulate the chicken coop. Free Range can mean a free dinner for the foxes and racoons. Having a sturdy coop that can be tightly shut will protect your hens from predators.
RabbitsNot a significant requirement. Similar to poultry.1 rabbit estimate of 5lbs of feed per week. Will vary with the cold weather. Rabbit will eat more during cold weather. Approximately $3- $8 dollars a week plus fresh food supplements such as leafy greens, carrots, bananas, applesTwice per day check and refresh water and food. During below freezing temperatures, water may need to be refreshed more often.Nail clipping needed and general body condition checks needed. Hutch must be secure and predator proof.
Goats - for milk, fiber or meat, field buddy for a horseYou may need to lift a goat onto a stand for examination or to give meds, shear fiber, or general care. Strength can be a factor although there are ways to work smarter and not harder. Goats prefer browse to pasture grass so the hay can be of lower quality, weedier except for lactating dams and last stage of pregnancy. Commercial goat chow cost average $13 - $18 for a 50 lb bag. We feed half a cup per goat/twice a day, with free choice hay and browse. Approximately 1 hay flake per goat per day (hay bales separate into portions called flakes)Basic care for a herd of goats will take about 30 minutes, two times per day. Check fences, observe the goats, feed, and water.
Weekly, clean up the stall area and remove soiled hay. Replace bedding. General stall cleaning and maintenance.
Goats require yearly vaccinations. You can learn to do this on your own, except for the rabies vaccine which in many states has to be administered by a veterinarian. Hoof trimming needs to be done two to four times a year. Breeding animals may require more care,
Pigs More cleaning will need to be done so more strength will be required. The pigs can be pushy and aggressive for food. Pigs are very resourceful and can use many different food types to convert to muscle mass. Kitchen scraps, garden waste, hay and commercial feed can all be used to produce a healthy animal. Pig feed average cost is $17. Whole corn is another alternative and can be a cheaper choice. Fencing for the pig area or pig pastures will be a time consuming factor before bringing home the piglets. I believe the use of electric fencing is a must with pigs. We use both post and board fencing with dual electric lines inside the fence line. I do not recommend raising pigs as a first homestead animal choice. I recommend developing some homestead instincts and animal knowledge before venturing into raising pigs
Cows - beefyes physical strength is required. varies. Pasture with strong fencing is a must. Finishing the beef cow on grain will run about $11 and $14 dollars a bag.daily care may not amount to much depending on your property but in the big picture, raising beef cattle can be very time consumingI do not recommend starting a homestead with beef cattle.

I hope this gives you a good start on gathering information before adding animals to the homestead. Remember, homesteading is a journey, not a race. Having a field full of livestock, but not enjoying caring for them, is not worth the effort or expense. Add what your family needs and can care for slowly. Enjoy the journey!

We raise animals on our farm for our homestead use. We are not commercial poultry or beef producers. The information I am conveying here is from this point of view. I welcome your  constructive comments below. Please share with us, your encouraging tips and advice for new homesteaders.

 

pig in mudDSC_3745-001 add animals to the farm Timber Creek Farm

adding animals to the homestead

 For more in this series please visit –

So You Want to be a Homesteader Part 1

 The Bookshelf- So You Want to be a Homesteader – Part 2

 

This post was shared on The Homestead Barn Hop

Simple Saturday Hop,

From the Farm Blog Hop,

Backyard Farming Connection Hop, 

Mountain Woman Journal Hop




Adding Geese and Ducks to Your Flock

adding geese and ducksHave you been considering adding geese and ducks to your poultry flock? Don’t ever say never, especially when talking about poultry! It all started in college. I had to visit many commercial poultry farms as part of the poultry production credits. I found the barns smelly and not very appealing. At the time, I said I would never raise chickens! 

Changing my tune about adding geese and ducks 

Fast forward a few decades and I not only raise chickens, but we also have guinea fowl, and lots of ducks and I am seriously considering adding geese this summer. Yes, Geese. The large water fowl that I said I would never want either after seeing them chase the neighbors children off the community beach!

adding geese and ducks to your flock

What to Feed when Adding Geese and Ducks to Your Flock 

Here are some reasons that made me change my mind about geese. After quite a few years now of raising chickens and ducks, we are pretty well set up for poultry on our farm. We have learned to  build housing for them that is versatile and can be easily separated into two or more living spaces. We know what types of food to feed, how to keep plenty of water available at all times and when and how to let the birds free range. Geese will be a great addition to our farm because of their excellent foraging ability. They fatten easily on grass and can be very good guard animals. Although geese were traditionally raised for meat, in recent times more and more people have kept a few geese as pets for weed control and protection. Ours will be added to the flock of ducks and chickens as guards and to add additional diversity to our farm. I am looking forward to watching them proudly strut around our farm.

 

adding geese and ducks to your flock

Ducks are also fun to raise. They are great for bug control, particularly slugs and snails which seem to be the duck’s favorite! While not as aggressive as geese on the protection level, ducks will create noise if upset and this acts as an alert. The duck’s eggs are sought after by many people. When adding geese and ducks to your flock you will find some friends seeking you out for duck eggs. Some people who cannot tolerate chicken eggs, can  comfortably eat duck eggs. Others just enjoy the somewhat stronger eggier flavor provided by duck eggs. I prefer duck eggs for baking because the slightly higher fat content adds a little more richness to the batter. 

 

adding geese and ducks to your flock

Is a Pond Necessary when Adding Geese and Ducks?

Water is a consideration when adding geese and ducks,  but it is possible to raise both successfully without having a large pond or body of water nearby. Many people will pick up one or two plastic children’s wading pools and keep these filled with water. The pools need to be dumped out and refilled daily but they are a fairly inexpensive way to provide plenty of water for the water fowl. In addition, we provide a bowl of water near the bowl of food because ducks like to eat and drink at the same time. 

 

adding geese and ducks to your flock

 

adding geese and ducks to your flock

The best food to use for treats is fresh greens. We use torn up lettuce leaves, chopped kale, chopped spinach leaves. Supplementing with fresh greens in the winter when fresh grass is not available, keeps the ducks and geese happy and healthy. Bread is not a healthy treat or food source for water fowl. It offers nothing in the way of vitamins and bread lacks most of the nutrients needed for healthy growth and development. In short, feeding the ducks bread can cause malnutrition and be detrimental to the water fowl’s health. We feed our ducks a commercial waterfowl feed, foraged greens, weeds, and fresh salad greens when available. In addition, provide some sort of grit for proper digestion. 

adding geese and ducks to your flock

photo credit www.homesteadhoney.com

How Adding Geese and Ducks to the New Chicks Can be Done 

Are you planning on raising ducklings, goslings, and chicks at the same time? Use a non medicated starter ration for a mixed flock. After 4 weeks, switch the  water fowl to a formula with a lower protein to prevent issues such as angel wing in the large, fast growing water fowl babies. Niacin levels are another concern when bringing up a mixed flock. Ducks and geese require a higher niacin level than chicks. The easiest way to supplement niacin is by adding food grade brewers yeast to their food. Sprinkling a tablespoon of brewers yeast on top of the food should adequately supplement the feed to meet the niacin requirement. Additional information on niacin levels for all poultry and water fowl can be found here from Metzer Farms.  Additional information on Angel Wing can be found here.

 Chickens, ducks and geese all need the following

1. Proper food and water

2. Safe shelter and nesting materials

3. Adequate space for foraging for greens and insects

4. A caretaker to check the health of the flock

 

adding geese and ducks to your flock

 

 My new book, Chickens From Scratch is available now through the Timber Creek Farm website or from Amazon.com

 

UPDATED to Add that we still  have not found the right geese at the right time. Also this year I went heavily into raising bantam chicken breeds. The geese will eventually find their way here to Timber Creek Farm, when the time is right.

 

adding geese and ducks

 

this post was a feature on From the Farm Blog Hop!

 




Can Turkeys and Ducks Live Together?

turkeys and ducks

Four years ago we found out whether turkeys and ducks can live together. After raising a pair of turkeys from poults we decided to breed them instead of eat them. The issue then, was where to house them. The turkeys had outgrown their grow out pen and needed a permanent place to live. Moving in with the ducks seemed like a probable solution. And it worked for a time. And then things went down hill fast. Let me tell you the story of Gus and Greta, our Naragansett breeding pair. 

A decision to raise a few turkeys for our family freezer or table led to keeping two turkeys to breed for hatching eggs. After buying the turkey poults, we ended up with only two. They developed into a beautiful Hen and Tom. We didn’t intend to get attached. They were kept in a different pen than the ducks and chickens who are kept for eggs. We tried not to notice how friendly and calm they were. We really tried to think about how delicious they would be on our table. We even told our family that this would lead to our Thanksgiving dinner centerpiece.

But, as time drew close and decision time drew near, we couldn’t do it. Gus and Greta Turkey had crossed that line and become part of the family. I placed my order for a free range turkey for Thanksgiving.

turkeys and ducks

So, now the dilemma was what to do with Gus and Greta. You see, they had outgrown their pen which would have been the perfect size had they lived out their initial life expectancy and become dinner. A lot of options were discussed. Fortunately we have plenty of space. Unfortunately we do not have a lot of time. Building a new building at this time was not going to happen. The Ducks had recently taken up residence in the new Duck Home. It is spacious,  low to the ground, and includes a covered pen. Plenty of room for two gentle turkeys to join the Ducks.

We also raise chickens for eggs. Housing turkeys and chickens together however can be a problem due to the possibility of Blackhead disease.

 The Turkeys packed up their feed bowl and water fount and moved across the street (ok not really a street, just a path between the coops) and moved in with the Ducks.  The Turkeys moved in and the Ducks ran into the house and refused to come out. We were thankful that there was no aggression. Although, I didn’t expect any. Both groups were extremely gentle. But now we had Ducks in the Duck house crowded into a corner and Turkeys standing in their new pen looking confused and lost. Turkeys and ducks living together? Not really. No Welcome Wagon, no here’s a cake we baked, welcome to the neighborhood. Nothing.

And to add to the drama, the Turkeys decided they liked the end of the pen with the swimming pool. So the Ducks just stayed inside, occasionally looking out longingly at their pool. The ducks were not willing to get to know the large newcomers.

By day three, I tried to intervene. I could get the Ducks to leave the house with appropriate treats used as a bribe but as soon as either turkey would so much as look at them, the Ducks would run back inside.

By day four, the Ducks were getting used to Gus and Greta Turkey. I even saw them eating out of the same food bowl! For one split second anyway, until the duck realized what was happening and ran back in the house.

Turkeys and ducks settle down differently at night too. The Turkeys liked to roost, but not until they had strutted around inside the house a while, inadvertently shepherding the ducks from one corner to the next. The ducks tuck themselves into corners or snuggle against the walls on the floor. 

turkeys and ducks

I knew we were on the way to complete acceptance. And, at least there was no blood or aggression to deal with. The ducks had resumed laying eggs and peace was returning to their lives. I thought maybe  the Ducks would soon reclaim the pool and go for a swim!

turkeys and ducks

The Rest of the Story of Turkeys and Ducks 

Happily Ever After… Not so fast. Just when you think you’ve set up a wonderful idyllic habitat for your animals to live in and Bam! Something goes wrong. In this case, after only two weeks of turkeys and ducks living together, my husband found two ducks in not so great shape. One had a wound on her wing but otherwise no major damage. The other ducky was found soaking wet, covered in mud and unable to move. Our first thought, after drying them off and taking inventory of symptoms and wounds, was that they got in a fight with each other. At the time neither one had  been laying eggs yet, so we thought they were boy ducks (these were the first Pekins we owned and I did not know to look for the tail curl). We dried off the wet duck, set up a crate with a heat lamp and lots of dry straw and made (him) comfortable. (S)he drank some water and we thought He (she) had just lost the fight. As the day  went on he (she) recovered a bit and we closed them up at night with high hopes for a full recovery.

turkeys and ducks

Early the next morning, I let everyone, including the injured duck, out in the yard while I cleaned up and filled feed bowls. I turned around and noticed that the turkey hen was quietly attacking the injured duck. What a bully! I grabbed up the victim and proceeded to separate the turkeys and the ducks. While cleaning up the crate, I found an egg! Apparently, I did not guess the sex of the Pekins correctly. Out of the three Pekins we were raising, all three turned out to be hens. At least with the Rouens the males and females look different!

Anyway, back to the story of the living arrangements. I mentioned this to a few poultry raising friends and found out that turkey hens can be quite aggressive. We had just added on the duck pen and duck house, and then added another pen to give them more room. It looked fantastic. Now we had to figure out a new housing plan for Gus and Greta. The turkeys and ducks would not be living together.

I was disappointed that our beautiful plan to house the turkeys and ducks had to be altered. The whole incident stepped on my vision of the animals peacefully living together in harmony. Looking back, I think if we had been free ranging the birds then, this might have worked out better. Although the space was ample, it was also good for hens setting territory. I think the turkeys missed interacting with the ducks. I was unwilling to take chances on finding wounded ducks again. Animals react on instinct and whatever it was that made Greta attack the ducks we will never know. The thing is though, these animals were mine to care for and protect. We had to come up with a plan. After a few days of trying different arrangements, we even considered re-evaluating the decision to not cook the turkeys. But then inspiration struck.

turkeys and ducks

The duck house had two pens and two doors. What if we put a fence down the middle of the house. The turkeys could use one door and one pen. The ducks could use the other door and other pen. Eureka! The turkeys and ducks could still live together. We even made the inside fence removable for easy cleaning.

Our initial disappointment at the squabbling led to an even better arrangement. Life is crazy, uncertain and ever changing. Enjoy the peaceful moments and be flexible because challenges will come.

turkeys and ducks



Turkeys and Ducks. The rest of the story

?(during the holiday season, I was asked to update the story of Gus and Greta.? It seems my good friend Judy, was so enchanted? by the story that she used it for a sermon at her church.? I do not attend her church so I did not have the pleasure of hearing the sermon but I did think it was pretty cool that my little blog was the inspiration.? So here you go Judy and all other followers of Gus and Greta.? The rest of the story.)
? Here’s the beginning of the story, if you missed it.

Ducks live with abandon.

Happily Ever After… Not so fast.? Just when you think you’ve set up a wonderful idyllic habitat for your animals to live in and Bam!? Something goes wrong.? In this case, after only two weeks of cohabiting, my husband found two ducks in not so great shape.? One had a wound on her wing but otherwise no major damage.? The other ducky was found soaking wet, covered in mud and unable to move.? Our first thought, after drying them off and taking inventory of symptoms and wounds, was that they got in a fight with each other.? At the time neither one had? been laying eggs yet, so we thought they were boy ducks.? We dried off the wet duck, set up a crate with a? heat lamp and lots of dry straw and made (him) comfortable.? (S)he drank some water and we thought He (she) had just lost the fight.? As the day? went on (she) recovered? a bit and we closed them up at night with high hopes for a full recovery.??

Poor beat up ducky.? She couldn’t even hold her head up.

Early the next morning, I let everyone, including the injured duck, out in the yard while I cleaned up and filled feed bowls.? I turned around and noticed that the turkey hen was quietly attacking the injured duck.? What a bully!? I grabbed up the victim and proceeded to separate the turkeys and the ducks.? While cleaning up the crate, I found an egg!? Apparently, I did not guess the sex of the Pekins correctly.? Out of the three Pekins we were raising, all three are hens.?? At least with the Rouens the males and females look different.??

Look at how Greta looks at Gus with devotion!


Anyway, back to the story of the living arrangements and what to do now.? I mentioned this to a few poultry raising friends and found out that turkey hens can be quite aggressive.? Space is not as much of a problem as time for us.? We had just added on the duck pen and duck house, and then added another pen to give them more room.? It looked fantastic.? How would we find time to build a suitable turkey area right away.

?I was disappointed that our beautiful plan had to be altered. The whole incident stepped on my vision of the animals peacefully living together in harmony.? And the strange thing is, I think the turkeys missed interacting with the ducks.? Animals react on instinct and whatever it was that made Greta attack the ducks we will never know.? The thing is though, these animals are mine to care for and protect.? We had to come up with a plan.? After a few days of trying different arrangements, we even considered re evaluating the decision not to cook the turkeys.? But then inspiration struck.

The duck house had two pens and two doors.? What if we put a fence down the middle of the house.? The turkeys can use one door and one pen.? The ducks can use the other door and other pen.? Eureka!? We even made the inside fence removable for easy cleaning.??



So far, it is working out beautifully.? The turkeys can still see the ducks who they are attached to in some weird way.? Peace reigns again.? Who knows for how long.? One thing I have learned from raising children and animals is this.? Just when you think you have it all under control…..

Our initial disappointment at the squabbling led to an even better arrangement.? Life is crazy, uncertain and ever changing.? Enjoy the peaceful moments and be flexible because challenges will come.?? and in the words of the famous Paul Harvey – that my friends is the rest of the story.

The End!